Jesse Flores, tattoo artist interview in Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel Aug 22, 2011

  Jessie Flores give Carrie Heebsh her first tattoo tattoo-artist-jessie-flores-in-action Jesse Flores, 37, has been tattooing for about 15 years, and has spent his last 13 at Body Ritual, at 1459 N. Farwell Ave. He got his first tattoo when he was 15, and settled into professional tattooing in the late '90s. Most tattoo shops offer piercing services as well and some artists do both, although Flores prefers to stick with tattooing. Q. How did you get into tattooing? A. "My uncles had already been doing tattoos, so I've kind of always been around it, from family and stuff like that. I picked up on it a little bit as a teenager, just messing around with it. But I didn't get into the tattoo business until probably the late '90s at a tattoo shop on the south side, when it first became legal around here. That's when I actually began tattooing professionally in a tattoo shop." Q. You have to be 18 to get a tattoo, right? A. "Yes, you have to be 18. No question about it. We've gotten people here who bring their parents, and their parents want to sign and they're like 16 or 17, and we're like, 'No. They have to be 18, no matter what.' " Q. Explain what the licensing process is like. A. "Each individual artist actually needs to have their own license. That's something we apply for yearly. It's a one-time yearly fee. "The shop has its own license saying the health department has come through and everything's up to code. They do an inspection of our rooms but they also do one of the shop. As far as the rooms go, we're in charge of the room. Anything that's inside of our rooms, we're in charge of cleaning, sanitizing, all that stuff." Q. When is your busiest time of year and why? A. "Tax returns. Definitely tax returns. At the end of January, we start to pick up on business. February, we are fully blown on business." The busy season generally will last into the summer and die down toward the end of the summer. Q. How does one get into tattooing? A. "The best way to go about it is to get an apprenticeship. Look for a shop that's willing to train you. If somebody does accept you, look at the person that's actually training you. See what kind of experience they have, how many years they've been into it. Look at their portfolio and see if that's the person that you want to get trained by. "It's a grueling process. There's not many people that stick it out because you do a lot of work and you're not getting paid for it. Usually, it's a year to two years before you even pick up a machine to actually do a tattoo on someone."

  • Compensation: According to Simply Hired, the average yearly income for tattoo artists in 2011 is around $32,000. The average salary for studio owners is $33,129 to $56,500, according to PayScale.com. In Wisconsin, artists and related workers earned an average of $36,386 a year in 2009. Entry-level workers made an average of $23,711, while experienced artists averaged $42,725, according to the Department of Workforce Development.
  • To get in: Getting into the tattoo industry can be expensive. You need to train in art and design, you will usually have to pay for your tattoo apprenticeship and buying all the equipment you need to start will amount to a large sum of money, according to Tattoo Training Information.
  • Outlook: The state Department of Workforce Development estimates an average of 10 openings a year for artists and related workers between 2008 and 2018.
60 Responses to Jesse Flores, tattoo artist interview in Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel Aug 22, 2011
  1. This is going to be very vague because it aerlly all depends. If the studio can use another artist, and they like your stuff, and you have potential, they may agree to sign you on as an apprentice at no charge but you might have to contract to tattoo there a certain length of time after your apprenticeship is complete. Some do it for free labor around the studio but in my eye that seems to be dwindling.Many now charge for apprenticeships and those fees vary widely. 1. It shows a stronger committment money talks 2. They have no room for you in the studio after you are trained. You could expect to pay $4-6K or so. I have not aerlly heard of more. Stay away from week or two tattoo “schools” as a primary source of training.

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  3. Sweet website , super style and design , really clean and use pleasant.

  4. Great post! Thanks for taking the time to write it.

  5. Great post! Thanks for taking the time to write it.

  6. Greetings from Ohio! I’m bored at work so I decided to check out your site on my iphone during lunch break. I enjoy the info you present here and can’t wait to take a look when I get home. I’m shocked at how quick your blog loaded on my mobile .. I’m not even using WIFI, just 3G .. Anyways, wonderful site!

Jesse Flores, tattoo artist interview in Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel Aug 22, 2011

  Jessie Flores give Carrie Heebsh her first tattoo tattoo-artist-jessie-flores-in-action Jesse Flores, 37, has been tattooing for about 15 years, and has spent his last 13 at Body Ritual, at 1459 N. Farwell Ave. He got his first tattoo when he was 15, and settled into professional tattooing in the late '90s. Most tattoo shops offer piercing services as well and some artists do both, although Flores prefers to stick with tattooing. Q. How did you get into tattooing? A. "My uncles had already been doing tattoos, so I've kind of always been around it, from family and stuff like that. I picked up on it a little bit as a teenager, just messing around with it. But I didn't get into the tattoo business until probably the late '90s at a tattoo shop on the south side, when it first became legal around here. That's when I actually began tattooing professionally in a tattoo shop." Q. You have to be 18 to get a tattoo, right? A. "Yes, you have to be 18. No question about it. We've gotten people here who bring their parents, and their parents want to sign and they're like 16 or 17, and we're like, 'No. They have to be 18, no matter what.' " Q. Explain what the licensing process is like. A. "Each individual artist actually needs to have their own license. That's something we apply for yearly. It's a one-time yearly fee. "The shop has its own license saying the health department has come through and everything's up to code. They do an inspection of our rooms but they also do one of the shop. As far as the rooms go, we're in charge of the room. Anything that's inside of our rooms, we're in charge of cleaning, sanitizing, all that stuff." Q. When is your busiest time of year and why? A. "Tax returns. Definitely tax returns. At the end of January, we start to pick up on business. February, we are fully blown on business." The busy season generally will last into the summer and die down toward the end of the summer. Q. How does one get into tattooing? A. "The best way to go about it is to get an apprenticeship. Look for a shop that's willing to train you. If somebody does accept you, look at the person that's actually training you. See what kind of experience they have, how many years they've been into it. Look at their portfolio and see if that's the person that you want to get trained by. "It's a grueling process. There's not many people that stick it out because you do a lot of work and you're not getting paid for it. Usually, it's a year to two years before you even pick up a machine to actually do a tattoo on someone."

  • Compensation: According to Simply Hired, the average yearly income for tattoo artists in 2011 is around $32,000. The average salary for studio owners is $33,129 to $56,500, according to PayScale.com. In Wisconsin, artists and related workers earned an average of $36,386 a year in 2009. Entry-level workers made an average of $23,711, while experienced artists averaged $42,725, according to the Department of Workforce Development.
  • To get in: Getting into the tattoo industry can be expensive. You need to train in art and design, you will usually have to pay for your tattoo apprenticeship and buying all the equipment you need to start will amount to a large sum of money, according to Tattoo Training Information.
  • Outlook: The state Department of Workforce Development estimates an average of 10 openings a year for artists and related workers between 2008 and 2018.
60 Responses to Jesse Flores, tattoo artist interview in Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel Aug 22, 2011
  1. This is going to be very vague because it aerlly all depends. If the studio can use another artist, and they like your stuff, and you have potential, they may agree to sign you on as an apprentice at no charge but you might have to contract to tattoo there a certain length of time after your apprenticeship is complete. Some do it for free labor around the studio but in my eye that seems to be dwindling.Many now charge for apprenticeships and those fees vary widely. 1. It shows a stronger committment money talks 2. They have no room for you in the studio after you are trained. You could expect to pay $4-6K or so. I have not aerlly heard of more. Stay away from week or two tattoo “schools” as a primary source of training.

  2. Regards for this rattling post, I am glad I found this internet site on yahoo.

  3. Sweet website , super style and design , really clean and use pleasant.

  4. Great post! Thanks for taking the time to write it.

  5. Great post! Thanks for taking the time to write it.

  6. Greetings from Ohio! I’m bored at work so I decided to check out your site on my iphone during lunch break. I enjoy the info you present here and can’t wait to take a look when I get home. I’m shocked at how quick your blog loaded on my mobile .. I’m not even using WIFI, just 3G .. Anyways, wonderful site!